Math for Teaching

Candidates in the Math for Teaching program can choose to complete the program by either taking nine courses and writing a thesis, or taking twelve courses ending with the Math 599 Teaching Projects Capstone Course.

The Thesis option is useful for those considering future academic work (such as a doctorate in education), and/or who wish to investigate a particular aspect of math education that might not have been featured as part of the regular Math for Teaching course sequence. Candidates who have worked on research projects in the past, and who like to work independently often select to do a thesis project.

The Teaching Projects Capstone Course (Math 599) was created for candidates who want to experience some of the independent nature of a thesis project but without the significant amount of writing required to complete a thesis.  As the final course in the Math for Teaching program, Math 599 is designed to give you the opportunity to explore and discuss a wide range of teaching and learning approaches related to the ones you have experienced during the program.  Class activities involve observing and reading about alternate teaching styles, experimenting first-hand with various teaching approaches, and discussing teaching philosophies in order to create meaningful personal teaching statements.  

The Capstone option works well for candidates who would like to explore more ideas about teaching math, but who appreciate the regularly scheduled structure of a semester length course.  The work done in the Capstone class mirrors some aspects of thesis projects, but with more emphasis placed on the practical aspects of teaching, and less on theoretical research results.

Math 599 is typically offered during the spring and summer terms, and is taught in a collaborative seminar style.

To learn more about the differences between these two options and to discuss which might be most appropriate for you, please contact the director of the Math for Teaching program.